Exercise: Vertical and Horizontal Frames

For the task of taking 20 images in portrait format followed by the same images in landscape format, I decided to go to Liverpool where there is an area of museums and art galleries all close together so I knew that there would be plenty of subjects to use.

I found this a really interesting exercise to undertake, it got me thinking about how I usually frame my images, and what situations are different. Thinking about it, using portrait came quite naturally to me, and in the situation of art galleries, statues, indoor subjects, I would either use portrait or use landscape but zoomed in for tight detail. Whereas if I was out at a wildlife location, I’d tend to use landscape and show some of the area around the subject.

I found this a really interesting exercise to undertake, it got me thinking about how I frame my images and what situations are different. Thinking about it, using portrait came quite naturally to me, and in the situation of art galleries and indoor subjects I would either use portrait or use a tight zoom in from landscape to capture detail. Whereas if I was out at a wildlife location, I’d tend to use landscape and show some of the area around the subject. As opposed to having all the images printed into my learning log I’ve focussed on 2 different sets of images to discuss. Of all of the images taken, I feel that the majority of them worked better in portrait mode, with a couple of images such as the cherub Puck, working equally well in both compositions, although I feel that’s more to do with a captivating subject than anything else.

The portrait version of Puck works well for me as you can see who he is and get a sense of the whole character, it has the context of him sitting on the mushroom which you didn’t see in the landscape version. With the landscape version you get more of a focus on the figure and its left to the viewer to consider who he is and what he is doing. So the difference in composition also affects the viewer’s perception of the subject.

The second example that I have is of a statue of Prince Albert on horseback. With the image taken from a landscape composition, it allows the viewer to see the setting and take in more of the background of where the statue is. The comparison with the portrait image is that it focuses mainly on the subject and ensures that it’s grabbing the viewer’s eye. Also there is a colour contrast between the green of the statue against the beige of the building that helps to make the subject stand out.

1 Landscape1 Portrait2 Landscape2 Portrait3 Landscape3 Portrait4 Landscape4 Portrait5 Landscape5 Portrait6 Landscape6 Portrait7 Landscape7 Portrait8 Landscape8 Portrait9 Landscape9 Portrait10 Landscape10 Portrait11 Landscape11 Portrait12 Landscape12 Portrait13 Landscape13 Portrait14 Landscape14 Portrait15 Landscape15 Portrait16 Landscape16 Portrait17 Landscape17 Portrait18 Landscape18 Portrait19 Landscape19 Portrait20 Landscape20 Portrait21 Landscape21 Portrait

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